Author Topic: Training Night Ideas  (Read 26050 times)

Offline Zippy

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Training Night Ideas
« on: August 18, 2009, 12:21:04 PM »
Has anyone had any marvelous Training nights/ideas that manages to get all involved in the past few years???  Let us all know your stories.

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2009, 11:15:22 PM »
anyone?  :evil:

Offline Bagyassfirey

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2009, 09:29:03 AM »
Beer n BBQ.....oh oh and just for "training" flick the dead man zone DVD in the player  :wink:

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2009, 09:34:49 AM »
gahhh,  :roll:....forum has not one ounce of goodness for training...im going on a holiday...

Offline Pipster

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2009, 10:32:52 AM »
Been too busy planning training to read the forum!!!

We spend some time on hose drill - in all sorts of scenarios.

I get them to work on ensuring they can bowl out all sizes of hose, couple lengths, get water flowing, and then make up (using our nifty "Peter Green" hose winder handles!!)

We give them scenarios, to get them to think out the best way of doing things.

EG, they have to couple together up to 5 lengths of hose, to reach the target, but have fences to get over / under.   The crews then have to work out the best way of getting to the target, and work out what works, what doesn't.

Also uses pump operators.

While the exercise might sound a bit basic,it ensures that all crew members are very efficient at getting all types of hose deployed.

Pip


There are three types of people in the world.  Those that watch things happen, those who make things happen, and those who wonder what happened.

Offline bajdas

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2009, 10:54:33 AM »
Has the brigade done a skills audit of its members ?

How does this compare to the SFEC or what you would expect the crews to do at a normal incident for your area ?

With the gaps identified between normal response type and skill set, aim to fix the issue in 3 months.

A training idea is to have an incident where the normal chain of command is disrupted (normal team leader injured) and the team needs to reform to achieve the goal (eg will someone naturally step forward to be the new team leader or will they just look at each other like a head-less-chook).
Andrew Macmichael
lives at Pt Noarlunga South.

My personal opinion only.

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2009, 11:08:37 AM »
Back from my holiday... lol


Badjas & Pipster, great ideas there!   ...brb i gotta work ;) watch this space.

Offline COBB

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2009, 11:38:31 AM »
Pip,

Can you let me know more about your '"Peter Green" hose winder handles'? (or pics)

cheers

COBB

Offline Pipster

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2009, 01:17:23 PM »
We have handles that you slide under the tray on the truck, and is capable of rolling 25, 38 & 64 mm hoses on the same handle.

It means people can stand up while roll up hoses, rather than rolling them on the ground, and means you don't end up with leaves / dirt etc on the hose

It takes a little bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it, we can roll hoses up far quicker (and far more comfortably) than the traditional method.

The handle was designed / built by one of our members (Peter Green) and they sell for about $150 per handle (all stainless steel).

Our brigade will NOT go back to the old way of rolling!

I have attached some pics.

Pip
There are three types of people in the world.  Those that watch things happen, those who make things happen, and those who wonder what happened.

Offline COBB

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2009, 02:12:08 PM »
Thanks Pip,
Definitely looks worth investigating.

regards
COBB

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2009, 02:43:47 PM »
Woulda thought its Standard Stowage by now ;)

Offline Alex

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2009, 07:27:00 PM »
Not standard stowage, but a few versions of them getting around now. One downside to them is it takes three persons to roll a hose without damaging couplings, versus a 2 person dutch roll.

I'd still roll 38s and 64s the old school way, but it sure makes 25mm a lot easier to roll up.

Offline crashndash

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2009, 09:41:45 PM »
ahhhh Alex, lets never progress and be open to change, shall we....thats a good chap, and besides, next big one, we always have the stock of canvas beaters in the back of the shed.

These things are a great idea. Contrary to the nay-sayers of doom, one (yes thats right....one) person can roll up a hose using them quite simply if they have big fireman muscles and dont need two wimpy chicken arms to turn the handle. Couplings are made of hard stuff and despite popular opinion do not become warped, buckled or bent by being dragged very slowly along the ground (even bitumen) as u roll up (even when the afore-mentioned big fireman muscles are on scene)

Of course Pip, i'm assuming your brigade still trains to roll them the old fashioned way, for strike teams or cross manning purposes....or even just to remind them to never lose the handle  :wink:

Offline Pipster

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2009, 12:55:53 AM »
Only train the old way for the newbies......!

A crew of 6 can roll a bunch of hoses on the handles, far quicker than the same number of crew trying to roll them on the ground....

There are a few tips & tricks we have learnt, which makes rolling hoses even easier....a guide does come with the handles...   :-D

Pip



There are three types of people in the world.  Those that watch things happen, those who make things happen, and those who wonder what happened.

Offline Alex

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2009, 02:18:35 AM »
ahhhh Alex, lets never progress and be open to change, shall we....thats a good chap, and besides, next big one, we always have the stock of canvas beaters in the back of the shed.

What change? These arent exaclty breaking technology. We have them in the brigade/group and they get used quite a bit mate, we have carried one on each truck [a differant version though] for at least ten years now.

Your comment re; damaging couplings is way off mate. Anyone worth there filtered knows dragging couplings, no matter how "slowly" across the fireground is no good for them. Doesn't take much to damage barway threads [which most of the state is still using??] or others for that matter, and fills them up with snot.

Not putting the hose winder down, but to be perfectly honest, anyone that uses them will agree it is a three person operation. 1 to wind, 1 to feed and 1 to mind couplings...
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 02:20:09 AM by Alex »

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2009, 08:49:34 AM »
Quote
Doesn't take much to damage barway threads [which most of the state is still using??] or others for that matter, and fills them up with snot.

About time to get with the AFAC Storz/Wajax Standard?? ;)

Just need to carry on each group appliance 2x SAFB Male to Storz, 2x SAFB Female to Storz, 2x SAFB Female to Wajax.

Offline Darius

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2009, 10:15:22 AM »
my brigade bought one of these 'peter green' winders per appliance about a year ago, best thing since sliced bread in our opinion.

Offline Alan J

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2009, 10:55:42 AM »
Interesting...
http://www.ufuvic.asn.au/common_couplings_paper_1.pdf is the latest AFAC position as of May 2008
Document (justifiably IMHO) assassinates Stortz for small diameter hoses, and
totally igores the existence of any couplings other than Stortz, Forestry & BIC.  

Ever.

So it's now Forestry for bushfire 25 & 38mm
Stortz for larger & for suction.

What's odd is that I had a prior AFAC document, 2005-ish vintage which stated
that while Forestry was the preferred small-diameter rural coupling, it wasn't
suited to high-pressure lines (>1200KPA from fuzzy memory).  It stated Barway
was the AFAC preferred standard coupling for these.  Wonder what changed their
minds about HP couplings?

cheers

« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 10:57:15 AM by Alan J »
Alan J.
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Data isn't information.  Information isn't knowledge. 
Knowledge isn't wisdom.

Offline Pipster

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2009, 11:03:43 AM »
Most of the state has Barway fittings?  In SA?   Sorry Alex, but there are very few Barway fittings in SA.

However, back to your earlier point - you are right, the best way to roll up 64 & 38 on the hose winder handle is using three people.  We don't generally drag our London couplings along the ground....

As for 25mm, with Forestry couplings, we find it better to allow the couplings to drag along the ground.....

But, even using the three people to roll hoses, it is quicker, and far more comfortable than rolling the same number of hoses the old fashioned way!!

Pip
There are three types of people in the world.  Those that watch things happen, those who make things happen, and those who wonder what happened.

Offline Alex

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2009, 03:29:38 PM »
I believe we are running barway fittings on our 25mm... ive never really been 100% on thread names. Perhaps time we caught up when it comes to those then as they damage easily.

What is the standard? We are running those, DEH are using wajax i believe??? Every time i go to a fire out of district we seem to come across a differant coupling type....

Offline Zippy

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2009, 03:53:42 PM »
Quote
Doesn't take much to damage barway threads [which most of the state is still using??] or others for that matter, and fills them up with snot.

About time to get with the AFAC Storz/Wajax Standard?? ;)

Just need to carry on each group appliance 2x SAFB Male to Storz, 2x SAFB Female to Storz, 2x SAFB Female to Wajax.

Water Delivery
25mm Wajax
38mm Wajax (odd, but i believe it works great for urban use too)
64mm Storz

Water Collection
64mm Storz
100mm Storz
150mm Storz

Offline Pipster

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2009, 12:45:37 AM »
I believe MFS might have had Barway on their 25 mm hoses, but that's about the only service in SA that was/ is? using Barway.

In the early days, when 25 mm was first introduced, there was no standard for coupling, so Groups got what they thought would work best for them.  I went to a fire where brigades from three adjoining groups each had a different coupling.

BSP was fairly common in the early days, Wajax (now called Forestry couplings, as Wajax is a brand name, not a coupling type) was also commonly.  There were at least two others that I can't think of the name of........

Anyway, Forestry couplings are the standard now for 25 mm....but it was a 20 year plan to change over all couplings to a standard Australia wide....might be about 18 years to go before we are all the same!!

Pip
There are three types of people in the world.  Those that watch things happen, those who make things happen, and those who wonder what happened.

Offline Alex

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2009, 01:21:16 AM »
I believe MFS might have had Barway on their 25 mm hoses, but that's about the only service in SA that was/ is? using Barway.


Oh well... at least we've got someone to play with then...

Offline KDOO_BTO

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2009, 09:39:29 AM »
Has anyone had any marvelous Training nights/ideas that manages to get all involved in the past few years???  Let us all know your stories.

Have a callout happen at the same time as training. Its amazing how many people who are usually busy in front of the idiot actually turn up
No ute No circle work

Offline CFSFirey661

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Re: Training Night Ideas
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2009, 12:29:43 AM »
Had a good training night a few weeks ago...got us thinking. The BTO filled a floating collar dam about 40 metres from the appliance, without moving it and only using the standard stowage on the appliance we had to draft from it.

After a bit of discussion and planning we used a 30 meter length of side line connected to a wajax/forestry to london round adaptor which was connected to a dividing breach with a rolled 64mm hose blocking the female end of the dividing breach. The other male end of the dividing breach we connected a couple of lengths of hard suction hose which we attached to the appliance.

We backflushed the hoses to help with priming and it worked really well. Good for getting water out of a flooded house for example  :-)

 

anything