Author Topic: 'Heavy' Rescue  (Read 37095 times)

Offline 2090

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'Heavy' Rescue
« on: October 19, 2006, 02:57:35 PM »
With the old guidelines of having a distinction between 'Heavy Rescue' and 'Rescue' resources now gone, I was wondering if anyone here who has been around a while knew how many brigades were 'Heavy Rescue' qualified. I read an old Volunteer magazine that said something along the lines of "Virginia and Stirling have upgraded to Heavy Rescue, with some other brigades to follow". What other brigades ended up being 'Heavy Rescue'?

On TAS there appears to have also been an old 'Heavy Rescue' course. Did this differ from the current RCR course in some ways? Was there any differences between 'Heavy Rescue' and 'Rescue' resources, apart from the amount of equipment carried?


Offline boss

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2006, 05:17:13 PM »
I am only going by what my old captain told my only that heavy rcr is for truck Rescue but it can be used for car Rescue as well

but i might not be wrong.  :-D
we save lives, we breath smoke, we eat ash, why do we do it? cos it's a way of life for us that we have chosen to take

Offline RescueHazmat

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2006, 11:20:46 PM »
Unless you *only* carry RIT equipment, I believe you would be classified as a heavy rescue, resource.


Offline medevac

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2006, 12:09:54 AM »
mmm i dont think theres any real "heavy" rescue or not anymore, as in brigade/unit status... (of course there are differances in classes of equipment)

your either rescue or you aint.


Offline 2090

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2006, 12:24:48 AM »
Yes I know that 'Heavy Rescue' does not exist anymore, I was asking in reference to how it used to be. With the old version of the RCR Resource Directory, you could have the 1st/2nd and Heavy Rescue Response all being a different brigade. Now you just have two brigades for 1st/2nd rescue. As you said medevac, you're either a rescue resource, or you're not.

Im just tying to find out how it used to be, and thus is there are brigades out there that carry well above the current required rescue stowage due them previously being 'Heavy Rescue'.

Offline oz fire

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2006, 12:13:58 PM »
Once upon a time, not that long ago, there were two standards for equipming RCR response vehicles - light or standard rescue could be hand operated, with smaller tools and heavy rescue was hydraulic, with larger tools - i.e. with greater tool capability - power, pressure etc.

Now at last we see one recognised minimum standard for RCR kits - brigades or units can go beyond that but there is at least a minimum.

Interesting though - the standard does not specify the capacity of the equipment force - i.e. difference in hydraulic output, therfore preasure and strength which means different vehicles still caryy different equipment - reduces interoperability!
Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

Offline bittenyakka

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2006, 02:49:59 PM »
So in a current rescue what do you get? I assume that all rescue brigades don't get a full complement of rams and everything else.

Offline 2090

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2006, 06:22:04 PM »
From Medevac, in another thread, this is the minimum list from the RCR Resource Diectory:

-hydraulic power unit
-heavy cutters
-heavy spreaders (double acting)
-300mm ram
-600mm ram
-2x10m hydraulic hoses minimum
-pulling chains or belts for spreaders
-auxillary pump
-generator, lighting
-general hand tools
-hazard cones and lights
-cribbing blocks and wedges (stabilisation gear)

This is really nothing compared to what some brigades carry. Multiple rams, multiple sizes of cutters, multiple spreader arms/tips, Tirfors, multiple airbags plus heavy duty stabilisation/shoring equip.

Offline bittenyakka

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2006, 01:25:00 PM »
Thanks :lol:
what thread was that

So even though there no longer is direct heavy and light some brigades Stirling carry more equipement.

Offline CFS_fire32

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2006, 03:19:41 PM »
FYI: Strathalbyn CFS now carries a Lucas Combitool on its 24P as well as a full Rapid Intervention kit to back up Strath SES heavy rescue.
The combitool replaces their 20+ year old set of FAG Lucas rescue gear.

Offline bajdas

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2006, 03:43:53 PM »
I believe the definition of heavy rescue is now being split into more defined areas.

For example, a USAR level 2 course is being run during the past three weeks in Adelaide. SAAS, SES and MFS members in attendance.

I understand that they are completing a 36 hour exercise Thursday & Friday as part of the end of the course.
Andrew Macmichael
lives at Pt Noarlunga South.

My personal opinion only.

Offline water boy

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2007, 05:00:54 PM »
"FYI: Strathalbyn CFS now carries a Lucas Combitool on its 24P as well as a full Rapid Intervention kit to back up Strath SES heavy rescue.
The combitool replaces their 20+ year old set of FAG Lucas rescue gear."


A Combi tool would be the way to go as back up rescue for heavy rescue. Less Locker room and still get the job done.

Offline 5271rescue

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2007, 05:38:08 PM »
Would like to know how they got that.....
blinky bill
my view only

Offline mack

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2007, 08:55:54 PM »
would like to know why they got that, would be the more appropriate question...

Offline Alan (Big Al)

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2007, 09:57:03 PM »
SES struggle really bad to man their rescue truck in Strath so they were given that to start rescue's in case SES were delayed in responding not a bad idea??
Lt. Goolwa CFS

Offline 5271rescue

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2007, 07:27:17 AM »
but you should have only got the combi tool and nothing else,I know remote area brigades would like to also have a combi tool so as to cover area when rescue is well out of the area as back up is too far away and you wont get anyone to do a coq while rescue is out of the group area...
blinky bill
my view only

Offline Mike

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2007, 09:30:09 AM »
I believe the gear was initially supplied to Strath for forced entry, as they are not RCR (Green Book), although they are still listed as RCR in the CFS regional directory. In reality, it was done so their crews could maintain RCR capabilities.

The SES have a local service agreement to respond CFS to any RCR to ensure adequate response. There have been a lot of accidents down that way requiring the extra gear lately, and has ment a start could be made while the 2nd response rescue was on its way.

From what i am told it seems to have its good and bad points. SES are still the lead agency and utilise the resources around them to do the job in a timely manner (as  we would expect everything is extremely professional and well done in the field).

However, the CFS seem to be a little narrow minded, and dont want to utilise the SES equipment for decent training.

Well done to the guys down that way for overcoming a problem for the better of the community and in a professional manner

* Other opinions reserved for the moment *
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 09:32:46 AM by Mike »

Offline Alan (Big Al)

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2007, 10:14:55 AM »
Forced entry to what??????
Lt. Goolwa CFS

Offline Mike

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2007, 11:21:50 AM »
* Other opinions reserved for the moment *

;) :evil: ;)

Offline RescueHazmat

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2007, 01:41:48 PM »
Forced entry to what??????

Tools can be used to force entry on structures etc.. anything where hydraulic intervention can be utilized..

Offline water boy

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2007, 04:50:45 PM »
I agree with mundcfs about the cfs supplying rcr crew to the ses when they cant crew or only roll with one or two crew (so i hear) I think that forced entry would cover vehicles also, not just gates or shed doors. I think the ses should be thankfull that the cfs has Nationally accredited trained crew that is willing to help out.

Offline Mike

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2007, 08:17:09 AM »
Quote
I think the ses should be thankfull that the cfs has Nationally accredited trained crew that is willing to help out.


Well, interestingly enough, neither service recognises the National Accreditation, (I know SES isnt an RTO yet, but they are already teaching the modules). Heard rumour that CFS is considering dropping national accredited courses because it hasnt had the desired effect of standardisation.

sesroadcrashrescue

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2007, 10:58:36 PM »
my understanding is there is three grades to rcr rescue

there is heavy rescue
light rescue
and rapid intervention

most cfs have light rescue gear 27 tone cutters and spreaders

we have both and are one of only 7 heavy rescue in the ses im not sure who has what in cfs but i belive that only a few cfs will have heavy rescue gear

Offline 6739264

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2007, 12:29:25 PM »
No such thing as three grades, well at least in terms of CFS and the Green Book.
To think they employed me as a drooling retard...

Offline Alan (Big Al)

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Re: 'Heavy' Rescue
« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2007, 03:30:39 PM »
Your either Rapid Intervention or Heavy.

We run lukas and i think our cutters are 45tonnes at the tip unsure of spreaders?

There are a couple of CFS brigades that upgraded to the really powerful stuff like Virginia?

Most of the Lukas stuff is heavy, what CFS origianlly bought was good and i think there was only one model of speaders and cutters above what they bought and they just opened a little farther and had a few more tonnes of cutting/spreading force but not much more.
Lt. Goolwa CFS